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NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

 

Accepting nominations for the 2022–2023 WALS season through January 21, 2022.

Watch lectures live at https://videocast.nih.gov at the time of the event.
Binge-watch the archives dating back more than 20 years at https://videocast.nih.gov/PastEvents?c=3.

Oh, one more thing…
Not at the NIH? Sign up for notices about each lecture

Upcoming Lectures

Translating Studies of HIV Immunity to SARS-CoV-2

January 26, 2022 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Julie Overbaugh, Ph.D., Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Understanding protective immunity to viral infections is critical to informing approaches to prevention. There is accumulating evidence that antibodies that bind viral entry proteins and mediate killing of infected cells may contribute to protection from infection and disease. Data to support this will be presented for HIV, with emphasis on pediatric infections. This lecture will also highlight how findings from these studies of immunity to HIV can inspire similar questions related to SARS-CoV-2.

Turning Genes into Medicines: Challenges in the Development of Gene Therapeutics

February 2, 2022 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Katherine High, M.D., AskBio

Katherine High joined AskBio in January 2021 as President, Therapeutics and member of the AskBio Board of Directors. Dr. High is responsible for driving the strategic direction and execution of the company’s preclinical and clinical programs. Most recently, she was a Visiting Professor at Rockefeller University.

Reconstruction of the Pathophysiology of Chronic Pain from Genome-wide Studies

February 9, 2022 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Luda Diatchenko, M.D., Ph.D. , McGill University

The Diatchenko lab investigates the psychological, molecular, cellular, and genetic pathways that mediate both acute and persistent pain states. Their primary goal is to identify the critical elements of human genetic variability contributing to pain sensitivity and pathophysiological pain states that will enable individualized treatments and therapies. Other related research endeavors include molecular hierarchy of functional SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) and SNP-depend regulation of gene expression, underlying molecular pain signaling.


The page was last updated on Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 10:30am